What we can learn from karaoke in PR

What we can learn from karaoke in PR

We went out as a company this week and hired a room in Lucky Voice to sing our hearts out.

It was a great night filled with fancy dress, pizza, drink and a convincing Robbie Williams tribute act.

It then got me thinking about how karaoke is similar to PR (stay with me) and what we can learn from letting our hair down with our colleagues.

 

Prioritise

When you’ve got five minutes remaining in the karaoke booth it’s important that you prioritise your final few songs to end on a high.

Can we squeeze in Bohemian Rhapsody or should we just skip to the chorus of a Whitney tune?

Prioritising your playlist and keeping the crowd pleasers blaring is key and so is how you manage your to do list at work.

One of the best pieces of advice I received once was to do the small tasks first rather than writing them on your to do list and getting to them later.

Sometimes replying to an email, reading an article or posting on social media takes the same amount of time as going through your to do list and writing it down to think about later. It also gives you more headspace.

Learning to prioritise in PR is an essential skill when you work in an agency and nailing this early in your career will certainly help you get ahead

 

Pride 

Shout loud and proud about your work and achievements to clients.

Tell them the process and give them the background on why you’ve secured that piece of coverage, written that strategy document or come up with a creative idea.

Clients should see the team as more than just a press office and you should look to add value to your clients in everything you do.

You don’t have to be the loudest person in the office (or in the karaoke booth) to show your clients you are the experts in the industry.

 

Question 

Clients pay you for advice you should strive to show your value every day.

I think it’s really important to constantly question – why – you are doing something for a client and challenge – what -you are trying to achieve.

For example, why should a client be commenting on a feature? What will that piece of coverage mean for the business? Does it match their business objectives?

And the link to karaoke? Make sure you always ask – why – you are doing something before you do it. Do I look good in this pink wig? Do I want to be filmed doing a Mariah solo with Bob from accounts?

 

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